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Child 10

High-level summit against the exploitation of children

When the C10 Awards took place in Malmö in January 2020, it was the sixth time that ten courageous leaders from Sweden and across the world were rewarded for the fight for some of the most vulnerable children in the world.

It started at some point in early 2013, Sophie Stenbeck, the chair of the Stenbeck Foundation, recollects. Sara and I were having dinner when I saw that look in her eyes. She had seen the look before, when Sara Damber came onboard as the COO of the foundation. That time, it was the start of what would later become Reach for Change. “This time, Sara was fired up after having read a book about the situation for children who fall victims to human trafficking. I had myself just returned from a conference on the same topic. We quickly arrived at… What can we do?”

After a couple of Skype-calls and discussions with experts in the field, the idea was born for the high-level meeting, the Child 10 summit – or C10. The name is inspired by the international summits like the G8. But the leaders who gather for the C10 are not ministers and heads of state, but activists, child rights champions, and social entrepreneurs. Through C10, they have a chance to take a step back from the heavy and often risky fight that is their daily life, and to meet and exchange experiences with others who face similar challenges. In order to raise the issue of the trade of children and the pioneering work that is done to combat it, the summit is combined with an award gala. The ten awardees are also given a financial support of 10,000 dollars.

Child 10 was founded 2014 to support organizations in Sweden and across the world who fight against organized sexual exploitation of children. Every year, they identify ten brave and inspiring leaders who fight for the most vulnerable children. Over the course of 48 hours, they meet in Sweden to exchange experiences and develop strategies, and work to prevent organized sexual exploitation of children. The ten awardees are also given a financial support of 10,000 USD.

“I want the foundation to operate as a link between, on the one hand, the people who work every day on the field against human trafficking, and, on the other hand, those who enact legislation and make political decisions.” Jacob Flärdh, Secretary General, Child 10

Since the first time the C10 Awards were held in 2014, 60 child rights activists from Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and North America have received the award. However, all awardees have not been able to attend the summit in person. Several have been denied visas, and others have had to stay at home for security reasons or to attend to urgent situations in the field.

One example is Oby Ezekwisili, the founder of #bringbackourgirls who was awarded in 2014 for her fight to free young girls who had been kidnapped by Boko Haram. But a dramatic development of events with new kidnappings in Nigeria forced her to change her plans last minute. She participated via Skype instead.

“I want the foundation to operate as a link between, on the one hand, the people who work every day on the field against human trafficking, and, on the other hand, those who enact legislation and make political decisions.” Jacob Flärdh, Secretary General, Child 10

When the C10 Awards took place in Malmö in January 2020, it was the sixth time that ten courageous leaders from Sweden and across the world were rewarded for the fight for some of the most vulnerable children in the world.

It started at some point in early 2013, Sophie Stenbeck, the chair of the Stenbeck Foundation, recollects. Sara and I were having dinner when I saw that look in her eyes. She had seen the look before, when Sara Damber came onboard as the COO of the foundation. That time, it was the start of what would later become Reach for Change. “This time, Sara was fired up after having read a book about the situation for children who fall victims to human trafficking. I had myself just returned from a conference on the same topic. We quickly arrived at… What can we do?”

After a couple of Skype-calls and discussions with experts in the field, the idea was born for the high-level meeting, the Child 10 summit – or C10. The name is inspired by the international summits like the G8. But the leaders who gather for the C10 are not ministers and heads of state, but activists, child rights champions, and social entrepreneurs. Through C10, they have a chance to take a step back from the heavy and often risky fight that is their daily life, and to meet and exchange experiences with others who face similar challenges. In order to raise the issue of the trade of children and the pioneering work that is done to combat it, the summit is combined with an award gala. The ten awardees are also given a financial support of 10,000 dollars.

Child 10 was founded 2014 to support organizations in Sweden and across the world who fight against organized sexual exploitation of children. Every year, they identify ten brave and inspiring leaders who fight for the most vulnerable children. Over the course of 48 hours, they meet in Sweden to exchange experiences and develop strategies, and work to prevent organized sexual exploitation of children. The ten awardees are also given a financial support of 10,000 USD.

“I want the foundation to operate as a link between, on the one hand, the people who work every day on the field against human trafficking, and, on the other hand, those who enact legislation and make political decisions.” Jacob Flärdh, Secretary General, Child 10

Since the first time the C10 Awards were held in 2014, 60 child rights activists from Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and North America have received the award. However, all awardees have not been able to attend the summit in person. Several have been denied visas, and others have had to stay at home for security reasons or to attend to urgent situations in the field.

One example is Oby Ezekwisili, the founder of #bringbackourgirls who was awarded in 2014 for her fight to free young girls who had been kidnapped by Boko Haram. But a dramatic development of events with new kidnappings in Nigeria forced her to change her plans last minute. She participated via Skype instead.

“I want the foundation to operate as a link between, on the one hand, the people who work every day on the field against human trafficking, and, on the other hand, those who enact legislation and make political decisions.” Jacob Flärdh, Secretary General, Child 10

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